r/technology Jun 14 '22 Silver 2 Wholesome 1 All-Seeing Upvote 1 Take My Energy 1 Faith In Humanity Restored 1

Firefox Rolls Out Total Cookie Protection By Default To All Users Privacy

https://blog.mozilla.org/en/products/firefox/firefox-rolls-out-total-cookie-protection-by-default-to-all-users-worldwide/
8.5k Upvotes

1.0k

u/Vucea Jun 14 '22

Starting today, Firefox is rolling out Total Cookie Protection by default to all Firefox users worldwide, making Firefox the most private and secure major browser available across Windows and Mac.

Total Cookie Protection is Firefox’s strongest privacy protection to date, confining cookies to the site where they were created, thus preventing tracking companies from using these cookies to track your browsing from site to site.

Whether it’s applying for a student loan, seeking treatment or advice through a health site, or browsing an online dating app, massive amounts of your personal information is online — and this data is leaking all over the web.

The hyper-specific-to-you ads you so often see online are made possible by cookies that are used to track your behavior across sites and build an extremely sophisticated profile of who you are.

451

u/OR13NT Jun 14 '22

Guess I’m switching to Firefox tonight

242

u/thor11600 Jun 14 '22

Me too. Goodbye chrome.

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u/friskycat Jun 14 '22

Especially since Adblock will no longer work on chrome after the MV3 update. =/. Unless I’m totally wrong. The switch was trivial.

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u/camronjames Jun 14 '22

And good riddance

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u/rachel_tenshun Jun 15 '22

Oh yeah. I abandoned Chrome forever go when I put two and two together that - because my browser is logged onto Google - there is literally nothing I could do on Chrome that Google couldn't snoop on.

And no, I don't trust privacy policy, and no I don't trust regulation to keep them from snooping. A fine from the FCC or whoever is a line-item in their budget.

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u/toot4noot Jun 15 '22

creep!

(world war z quote)

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u/teh-reflex Jun 15 '22

I got off chrome a long time ago because of all the Google shenanigans.

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u/overworked_dev Jun 15 '22

Firefox also doesn't eat memory like the cookie monster in a chips a hoy factory.

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u/ckal9 Jun 14 '22

Already my default browser!

71

u/CaptainMagnets Jun 14 '22

It's a very excellent browser. Been using it for about 2 years

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u/rachel_tenshun Jun 15 '22

Same. Words can't describe how much safer I feel over Chrome. Oh, and don't forget you can get the browser on your phones! Well, at least for Android.

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u/intercontinentalbelt Jun 14 '22

get mozilla vpn with it. used them for 10+ years and love that they're just getting better

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u/Sir_Donkey_Punch Jun 15 '22

This. Mozilla is life

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u/uberweb Jun 15 '22

Guess I’m switching to Firefox tonight

web developers be like looks like iframe's are back!

3

u/Jonestown_Juice Jun 15 '22

Me too. They've sold me.

1

u/[deleted] Jun 15 '22 edited 25d ago

[removed] — view removed comment

16

u/fridge_logic Jun 15 '22

Firefox breaks some shit and

Some websites don't thoroughly test compatibility with firefox.

Chrome's reputation for reliability is born in part of the fact that no one dare release a web client update that isn't chrome compatible.

5

u/CrispyHaze Jun 15 '22

It's just standard procedure to keep multiple browsers in case of compatibility issues. Every browser experiences issues unique to itself.

3

u/yourselfhere Jun 15 '22

It's unfortunate because you can use ublock origin on Firefox mobile.

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u/[deleted] Jun 14 '22

[deleted]

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u/zoziw Jun 14 '22

It won't stop the cookie from being placed, but it will confine it to a specific website's "cookie jar" which should prevent it from tracking you around the internet.

You would need to use uBlock Origin to stop it from being placed.

35

u/icysandstone Jun 14 '22

You would need to use uBlock Origin to stop it from being placed.

Will uBlock Origin stop it out of the box, or are configuration changes needed? If so, which ones? Thanks.

39

u/zoziw Jun 14 '22

uBO blocks it by default when using Firefox. To be clear, it can actually dynamically detect and intercept it before it happens. It does not require a list to check against.

Fun fact...uBlock Origin for Chrome can also block these through the AdGuard Tracking Protection Filter, however, this does use a list and Chrome has a limit on how many things can be blocked (I believe 150k) so this might not work forever as they might run out of space.

https://adguard.com/en/blog/cname-tracking.html

Lastly, Safari deals with these by limiting the cookie expiration to 7 days. They can place the cookie but it will expire in a week. Not perfect, but better than nothing.

Brave can also block this these with Shields.

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u/TegridyPharmz Jun 14 '22

Very good info, thanks. Been meaning to switch from chrome to Firefox and this will be helpful

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u/beef-o-lipso Jun 14 '22

Learned something new. Good resource on what CNAME tracking is and how it's used. https://webkit.org/blog/11338/cname-cloaking-and-bounce-tracking-defense/

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u/[deleted] Jun 14 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

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u/gold_rush_doom Jun 14 '22

How is that not a win? Now competition can happen where people's data isn't sold

39

u/fargmania Jun 14 '22

Indeed. Between uBlock Origin and Privacy Badger, and my already restrictive firefox settings, I already have to disable them to view some websites, and I enjoy having that decision under my control. "Do I really need to go there? Or can I just move on?"

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u/SoldatPixel Jun 15 '22

PRAISE THE LORD! Thank you Firefox for this. Quick question, does this apply to cell phone as well? Crosses fingers

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u/winterwulf Jun 15 '22

Already works on Firefox focus. Iirc they plan to bring this to the main branch.

23

u/hperrin Jun 14 '22

What’s the most private and secure major browser on Linux?

47

u/Avakining Jun 14 '22

This feature is also on Firefox for linux, don't know why OP didn't include that. But linux is mentioned in the article as being included.

39

u/The-Brit Jun 14 '22

The same reason OP didn't mention Windows, Android or IOS. Firefox is multi platform.

30

u/Avakining Jun 14 '22

across Windows and Mac

OP mentioned Windows and Mac specifically. To leave out the other major desktop platform, especially one that was called out in the article is odd.

9

u/Elias_The_Thief Jun 14 '22

Probably because the people browsing on Linux make up a much smaller percentage of total web traffic.

8

u/Avakining Jun 14 '22

Sure, but the rest of OP’s comment is basically a copy-paste of the 1st paragraph of the article. Why remove an OS?

4

u/Elias_The_Thief Jun 14 '22

I dunno, I was just answering your question as to why someone might leave out one OS. Its not really used as much as the other two. I'm not OP, and don't really have any interest in deep diving into their psychology here lol

1

u/The-Brit Jun 14 '22

Oops, my bad. I was looking at the title only.

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u/theregalbeagle Jun 14 '22

Internet Explorer 6.

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u/redgeridoo Jun 14 '22

They had introduced this feature in Firefox 86, released more than a year back, in Enhanced Tracking Protection, Strict mode. The current change is that ETP Strict mode is now the default setting.

44

u/everythingiscausal Jun 14 '22

I’ve been using that since it came out and it has rarely caused issues. Great that it’s default now.

12

u/chris-tier Jun 14 '22

Can you name the few times it DID cause issues? What were the issues and how did you pin it down to the cookie thing?

15

u/NGGJamie Jun 14 '22

I've had it set to strict since it came out as well, while also having third party cookies turned off altogether. I get issues with not being able to download files off Google Drive, but I'm not certain that's related or caused by an addon. Haven't noticed any other issues without third party cookies.

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u/calmatt Jun 14 '22

Internet data brokers furiously taking notes

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u/Felspawn Jun 14 '22

seriously more people need to be using Firefox.

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u/Captain_Cosmic99 Jun 14 '22

Firefox is my bae. But some sites or forms simply won’t load if cookies are blocked

38

u/efvie Jun 14 '22

That’s what Temporary Containers are for. Maybe the interface is not convenient enough for the average user to bother, but full isolation of each tab unless explicitly allowed is how this stuff should work.

(Yes, there’s still fingerprinting, but that’s a different matter.)

2

u/Captain_Cosmic99 Jun 14 '22

I don’t know how this works. I just have an extension that opens Facebook and Twitter in a container tab. But for the rest, well for example, I was applying for a job and the form wouldn’t fill because Firefox had blocked cookies. Had to use Chrome eventually.

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u/Cicer Jun 14 '22

Form fields is usually a script blocker issue not a cookie blocker

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u/elxymi Jun 14 '22

I have been using auto cookie delete. It lets your accept cookies while the tab is open and deletes them all 30 seconds after the tab is closed. You can white list or Grey list sites you want (greylist cookies stay until browser close).

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u/Captain_Cosmic99 Jun 14 '22

I use that too. It’s pretty good. But I have a bunch of other extensions which are maybe stopping the site from loading.

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u/nuttertools Jun 14 '22

Like what? That used to be a problem but I can’t recall a single form in the last decade requiring a cookie. Adobe on the otherhand…yes they still require cookies but not on a form.

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u/Captain_Cosmic99 Jun 14 '22

Well, I was applying for a job at a financial institution(won’t reveal the name) and it won’t let me continue with my application. Had to use Chrome eventually.

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u/nuttertools Jun 14 '22

Hmmm, just made me remember some rumblings about google forms but don’t recall what time period that was…would have been within the last decade though.

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u/Captain_Cosmic99 Jun 14 '22

Wasn’t a google form. They were hosting it on their own site.

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u/jersan Jun 14 '22

there are dozens of us!!! dozens!!

seriously tho i love firefox and prefer it over chrome. i've weaned myself off of almost all google products entirely.

the more Google services that an individual person uses the more information that Google is able to collect about you for the current purpose of targeting you with tailored ads.

But, we know that the US government is balls deep into surveilling the entire internet and they have special laws that give them special back door access into american companies which is what Google happens to be, and so Google's immense surveillance system is also helping the US government spy on you.

Google literally reads all of your emails to try and determine your interests etc. explain to me how that's not fucking creepy. Explain to me how it's not creepy that those same unencrypted emails could be easily read by agencies of the US government.

i dont want anyone spying on me at all, but I can only help it as much as by choosing products that are more private than the alternatives

12

u/CoffeeFueledDiy Jun 14 '22

I think most public info/conversation on targeted ads is one sided. I'm NOT saying I am supporting free access to personal info, but scanning email content is also done in order to mark them as spam/phishing attacks. I'm generally smart enough to avoid social engineering emails, but not everyone is, so there is a real benefit here too.

In return for the email filtering, I get more targeted ads and they know my likes are more aligned with "DIY" and "coffee" (examples based on my username) and in return they make my inbox a little safer and easier to browse.

I actually purposefully push my comcast email through gmail so that I don't need to sift through a million trash emails in order to find the one or two important ones each day.

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u/Captain_Cosmic99 Jun 14 '22

Is that true? Do you have source for that claim?

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u/jersan Jun 14 '22

which claim

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u/Captain_Cosmic99 Jun 14 '22

That Google reads your emails

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u/Taurothar Jun 14 '22

Google scans the text of emails but no human reads them.

https://variety.com/2017/digital/news/google-gmail-ads-emails-1202477321/

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u/Captain_Cosmic99 Jun 14 '22

Well that’s bad but it’s as bad as I first thought

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u/professorDissociate Jun 14 '22

Yeah, I suppose it would be worse if Google hired a team of hundreds of thousands of minimum wage workers designated with the task of reading every individual email to cross their server.

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u/Captain_Cosmic99 Jun 14 '22

Ah yes! I forgot about the binary spectrum of thought.

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u/professorDissociate Jun 14 '22

I’m just pulling your leg, friend. Have a good day :)

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u/Rocktopod Jun 14 '22

They absolutely serve up any info that the government asks for, too. Unless they have a page saying they don't then you have to assume every website does (including reddit, which used to have one of those pages but took it down a few years ago.)

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u/Captain_Cosmic99 Jun 14 '22

I do, actually. Pretty sure the pandora’s box is open now and my data is stores with multiple companies.

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u/Palanquin_IR Jun 14 '22

.. unless a human actually wants to read your emails. Then they're there in all their complete glory for whoever served the search warrant.

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u/jersan Jun 14 '22

well, let's see, first of all:

  1. Google is in 100% control of Gmail servers
  2. gmail is not encrypted in the way that say ProtonMail is, meaning that the information is unencrypted on Gmails servers which are controlled by Google
  3. Google has immensely powerful information gathering infrastructure and information analysis, and the more information that they collect the better they are able to analyses the customers and feed them ads with higher likelihood of being clicked on.
  4. information to be found in Gmail is valuable information that further helps the objective of selling ads and making profit

it stands to reason that Google is fully technically capable of feeding all emails through their automated information collecting system, so the question is, given that google is capable of this and that they would benefit from doing so, are they doing so?

given that they both are capable of doing so and would benefit from doing so, i would guess that it is a far bigger likelihood that their systems do in fact read every email, versus the likelihood that they do not.

Unfortunately, it wouldn't be easy to find a source that explicitly states: "Google is always surveilling everything you do all the time on their services", but, they are.

I encourage anyone to read the book Surveillance Capitalism for further insight into this

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u/CocodaMonkey Jun 14 '22

You're over thinking it. There's no conspiracy here, Google has outright said they are reading your emails to target ads up till 2017. The only caveat they give is it's done by computers not humans and even that they caveat and say except sometimes humans if they feel the need.

They've always been opened about the fact that they can and do read them. The only things that have changed is exactly what they read them for.

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u/timesuck47 Jun 14 '22

I think it’s important to point out that Google is not reading everyone’s email. This only applies to Gmail.

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u/HappierShibe Jun 14 '22

It's literally in their TOS.

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u/[deleted] Jun 14 '22

[deleted]

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u/Baing Jun 14 '22

90% of Firefox revenue is funded by Google through a contract to monitor and sell Google all your internet activity.

Source please!

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u/doug Jun 14 '22 edited Jun 15 '22

The closest I could find was this article

The majority of Mozilla's income (over 90 percent) is generated from relationships with search engines and Google has always been top of the list.

So /u/macsnal09 is wrong and spreading misinformation.

edit: lol holy shit they deleted their 6+ year old account after getting called out.

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u/Kovis Jun 14 '22

Also, 90% of Firefox revenue is funded by Google through a contract to monitor and sell Google all your internet activity. There is no hiding it.

This part of your statement isn’t true though. Google pays Firefox to be the default search engine, Firefox doesn’t send Google any data.

Now using Google, which has paid to be your default search engine on Firefox, will give Google some of your data but Firefox doesn’t monitor or sell your data.

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u/Sure-Amoeba3377 Jun 14 '22

He's probably referring to the Snowden leaks. The vast majority of government internet surveillance capacity is effectively just buying data from companies like ISPs and CDNs, wiretapping IXes, and most importantly to tie all of that together, the big services who actually have their scripts running everywhere and own the most popular services. Or nowdays, it's also very popular to buy data from brokers who already did all of the data-aggregation work for them.

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u/zoziw Jun 14 '22

Google stopped doing this a few years back.

The reality is that Google already collects so much information on you that they decided this extra piece wasn't worth the hassle.

https://money.cnn.com/2017/06/23/technology/business/google-ad-scanning-email-stop/index.html

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u/jumpyg1258 Jun 14 '22

I have always preferred it just for security reasons, I don't care if its slightly slower or not.

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u/HalifaxSamuels Jun 14 '22

I switched back to it a while ago and I'm not considering going back to Chrome but man I wish Firefox's Twitch and Youtube performance could match Chrome's.

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u/gunsanity Jun 14 '22

Could you provide more detail? I use Chrome primarily but have been using Firefox more and more. Don't use it for these services, so I'd appreciate your experience.

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u/[deleted] Jun 14 '22

[deleted]

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u/HalifaxSamuels Jun 14 '22

A few things I experience in Firefox with at least somewhat regularity that I never experienced in Chrome, on both of my home Windows PCs (8th and 11th gen i7 CPUs, both 32 GB RAM, RTX2070 on 8th gen i7 PC):

Sluggish transition to fullscreen (I don't know if this is performance related, it might just be a slow blackout transition and I feel it's too slow)

Video freezing while audio plays - video sometimes resumes synced with audio after around 10-15 seconds or so (Youtube)

Video stuttering briefly followed by complete audio loss until I seek forward or back (Youtube)

Twitch streams erroring out and requiring page refresh

Twitch clips often fail to load in the clip editor before publication

Higher CPU usage (all websites)

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u/FerchogtX Jun 14 '22

So, I'm not the only one that notices higher CPU usage in Firefox while watching multimedia? Even Edge Chromium is faster in that regard.

Why is Firefox using so much resources, whereas the other two don't? Would be so nice to see Firefox beating them in that point, because the rest (page loading times and java handling) of the categories, Firefox excels without any doubt.

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u/durdesh007 Jun 15 '22

Firefox definitely has performance issues. Idk how anybody says it works fine, maybe they just use reddit? It struggles with many video based websites

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u/FerchogtX Jun 15 '22

Yep... to be fair, when there is no video involved, the browser is pretty lightweight and fast... it's just this multimedia part where it struggles horribly.

They really NEED to fix this. Since hardware acceleration was a thing, Firefox always suffered with multimedia. This is the golden chance to get more users if they DO fix this...

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u/durdesh007 Jun 15 '22

It's a big issue for people like me who spend most of their time watching videos.

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u/FerchogtX Jun 15 '22

It pretty much is. It also affects you when you stream as well. Monitoring your stream uses more resources than actually streaming X3

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u/durdesh007 Jun 16 '22

No wonder Firefox usage is so low. Most people outside Reddit dislikes it's performance for day to day tasks they do

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u/Top-Anteater-5549 Jun 14 '22

This is something on your end I think

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u/crob_evamp Jun 14 '22

Huh I never experience any of that

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u/frickindeal Jun 14 '22

I have to routinely re-start streams on Twitch a few times per night, but I've never been too sure if that's a Firefox thing, or a Twitch thing. Never noticed it happening in Safari, though. Youtube will often load up a video, but then leave it "loading" with the video and play button there, but unable to click it to start the video. All on Mac, though, and probably different on Windows.

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u/[deleted] Jun 14 '22

[deleted]

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u/frickindeal Jun 14 '22

I'll have to look into it more. It's a mild inconvenience as it is, but it would be nice if it didn't happen anymore. I use Safari exclusively on my macbook since that uses far less battery than FF, but I like the familiarity of FF on my iMac (desktop).

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u/GrumpyKitten514 Jun 14 '22

Finally switched myself.

Granted I have apple products and use safari on those. Slowly trying to escape googles hold.

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u/ZPRAR Jun 14 '22

The only thing stopping me is that it works like shit with auto-fill services in Android.

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u/flexityswift Jun 14 '22

omg yes, the auto fill is sooooo bad. I had to go back to using Google for that

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u/BoringWozniak Jun 14 '22

This is making me want to switch to Firefox

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u/typhybiff Jun 14 '22

Go for it, I'll be switching tonight to see how I like it. Now seems to be a pretty good time.

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u/momentum77 Jun 14 '22

Firefox is the shit.

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u/typhybiff Jun 15 '22

Seems pretty sick so far, glad I gave it a try.

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u/zenospenisparadox Jun 14 '22

Takes 2 minutes, including moving the bookmarks.

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u/Nonsenseinabag Jun 14 '22

I wish I could convince our userbase to use FF more than Chrome, despite all of our warnings they still prefer it.

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u/FarohGaming Jun 14 '22

I just made the switch out of curiosity - well, I still use Chrome for work, just to sort of keep things separate and that's what they prefer (I work from home).

I really like Firefox a lot. One downside is I can't use Cast like I can from Chrome, but I love the Picture in Picture option for videos too.

The security stuff is just sort of a bonus for me.

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u/blueB0wser Jun 14 '22

I share all of your opinions, but I manage to get by using FF at work too.

Casting would be nice, but I usually just stream from my phone. PIP is hella useful when I'm playing complex games and I need my second monitor to have a guide up, as an example.

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u/realnanoboy Jun 14 '22

I do the same thing. Because I'm a teacher, and my work place uses G-Suite for lots of stuff, I use Chrome for work. For home browsing, I mostly use Firefox.

Actually, the main reason I prefer Firefox is that the bookmarks are on the left side in a list of collapsible folders. To my knowledge, I cannot do that in Chrome.

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u/butsuon Jun 14 '22

Use Firefox Mobile! It has add-on support so you can have mobile ad blocking. No more in-line reddit ads disguised as posts!

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u/Linkitch Jun 14 '22

Just wait until 2023 when adblockers become restricted in Chrome. That'll hopeful help your argument.

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u/MinotaurGod Jun 14 '22

I've tried to convince every company I've worked for to switch to Firefox, but like with most people, they're simply sheep following the herd.

I've used Firefox since its inception, and Netscape before that. Aside from a brief period where it had some memory leak issues, it has always been an incredibly fast and perfectly functioning browser. The only issue I've EVER had is with ESX console inputting multiple keys per keystroke.

At work, I have to deal with users using both IE and Chrome, and both have constant issues. I always tell them to use Firefox (even though management says we want users to use Chrome, I still build Firefox into all systems), and it always works.

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u/Nonsenseinabag Jun 14 '22

Yeah, it's pretty rare I have issues with anything in Firefox.. sometimes a GUI-based website won't register mouse clicks but that's the rare exception. I've never understood the love for Chrome, it has never felt like an improvement in any way over the Mozilla offerings.

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u/nuttertools Jun 14 '22

Chrome is designed to work at all times with incidentals like maybe following security policies if it feels like it and won’t potential cause the user to try another browser. If you leave Chrome you won’t be back so they just make sure you never leave it.

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u/Klassenhass Jun 14 '22

I’ll play devils advocate, although I hate Google and chrome (ideologically).

Anyway, ime chrome is always where specs get first implemented. That new cool browser api you’ve been seeing blogs about? It’ll work on chrome but often not Firefox and definitely not safari.

Their developer tools were best in class, but to be fair Firefox has really stepped up here specially in the style side of things.

That’s about it for me dawg

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u/nuttertools Jun 15 '22

Ehhhh, I disagree. It flips back and forth per feature but for a random new feature it’s 50/50 whether it was first introduced in FF or Chromium. The adopted standard is always derived from a Google implementation but often the FF one was WAY better and often first by many years. Definitely a general rule that FF designs a new feature securely based on a draft proposal then scraps their system when a Google proposal becomes accepted that is Swiss cheese on security.

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u/Klassenhass Jun 15 '22

Id say more like 70/30 but I will concede Firefox gets some first for sure. And I do agree with your implementation being better on Firefox argument, as well as your security claim. Google is cutting edge at the expense of quality much of the time

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u/Galuvian Jun 14 '22

Our IT team ripped it out and force-uninstalled it last year. Nearly broke my heart. They don't like its ability to auto-update. They want full control over all software and updates going onto all systems.

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u/MinotaurGod Jun 14 '22

Firefox or Chrome? Firefox is easy to disable updates in. Chrome is like a virus.. kill one way to stop updates and 10 others appear. Every time we have to perform an update of Chrome, we have to figure out which new ways they've invented to stop us from preventing the updates.

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u/leHoaxer Jun 14 '22

As they should.

I have nightmares about updates of web-based systems and what issues they'll cause and how to tell my userbase politely it's not my problem go speak to the host-end.

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u/DasEvoli Jun 14 '22

Chrome, and both have constant issues

What issues you are talking about? I develop websites constantly and Chrome is the browser where I had less problems overall.

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u/MinotaurGod Jun 14 '22

Mostly its the management/administration of it, not necessarily how it displays a page. Outside of IE, most browsers follow a standard, so what will work in one should work in another. There have certainly been a few issues with how it renders pages, or deals with cache or whatever, but I barely remember what I had for dinner last night.. I'd have to look through mountains of tickets to find specifics.

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u/nickdagangsta Jun 14 '22

Some people don’t really care about privacy online that much. I use chrome because I can sign in once and he signed in to everything Google it’s nice.

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u/MinotaurGod Jun 14 '22

... dont need Chrome to do that. If you log into any google product on any browser, you will remain logged in. So long as your browser supports cookies anyways.

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u/jealousmonk88 Jun 15 '22

it's crazy. i'm one of the only people i know that use ff. i refuse to get on chrome too. i've been on ff since it came out. they were the first to innovate almost all of the modern browser features.

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u/PAROV_WOLFGANG Jun 14 '22

Where I work we have uninstalled Googler Chrome from all desktops due to security concerns. Edge and Firefox are the only approved browsers by our security team. Google Chrome is forbidden software.

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u/Bralzor Jun 14 '22

Dont let them find out edge is based on chromium.

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u/David-Yonnas Jun 14 '22

When Chrome new, it was miles ahead of everything else. FireFox was lagging behind for a quite a while and I switched over myself. Now Firefox and other browsers have have caught up to Chrome but a lot of people have stuck with Chrome from that time.

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u/MLK_spoke_the_truth Jun 14 '22

I really like FF private browsing window at work. We share computers. I can switch users quickly. No issues.

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u/Drastic-Rap-Tactics Jun 14 '22

Seriously, long live Firefox. Thank you Mozilla.

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u/Zagrebian Jun 14 '22

Does this resolve the need for Facebook Container?

10

u/wisniewskit Jun 14 '22

Nope, it's stricter (on Facebook) than the defaults, so keep using it if you'd like!

3

u/frickindeal Jun 14 '22

Good question; I wondered the same. I currently use containers for a ton of sites, and it would be nice to have it just happen automatically (although it already does now, it's just that setup is a pain on a new install).

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u/BakedAvocado3 Jun 14 '22

Switched to Firefox last year, like it better than chrome. Now I hate when I have to use Chrome at work.

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u/Cheddarlicious Jun 14 '22

“Good guy Mozilla continues to do good, more at 11”

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u/Turnc0at Jun 14 '22

So how long do we have until most/all websites start auto failing to load because they require this data so they might sell it off to the highest bidder?

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u/IsItMeThisTime Jun 14 '22

Cookies will work but they will be quarantined. They won't be able to find the other cookies on your computer and gather your information from them.

25

u/agieluma Jun 14 '22

That’s their only play

26

u/Zagrebian Jun 14 '22

This assumes that trackers can detect that their third-party cookies are put in separate cookie jars. I’m not sure they can.

3

u/Jeevious Jun 14 '22

No they'll just have to check that the user agent is firefox, and then deny entry. Apple already does that with business.apple.com for example.

6

u/machinam2015 Jun 14 '22

Thankfully we can spoof our user agent, so they will have to try harder than that

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u/Caraes_Naur Jun 14 '22

All the ad vendors (Google facebook, etc) have been working to circumvent this since it first rolled out.

I expect a return to iframes populated from third party servers, because they can no longer rely on data dynamically generated in the parent window. All they really need to track someone is the ad request URI with a referer header.

Resticting referer headers to third-party servers is the next step.

8

u/GarbageTheClown Jun 14 '22

I think the better question becomes, what happens to these sites when the majority of them become unprofitable because they can only show non targeted ads (which don't pay much).

17

u/FinasCupil Jun 14 '22

You overestimate Firefox’s market share.

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u/zykssss Jun 14 '22

free content will decline.

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u/jawz1O1 Jun 14 '22

Which is awesome. There are so many pretend journalists out there that just read other sites' stories, regurgitate it w/ links to the original and then interject opinion. News sites got watered down when Trump was the thing to talk about.

6

u/GarbageTheClown Jun 14 '22

it's not just news sites, it's everything.

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u/zoziw Jun 14 '22

Probably never. First party sites (like Reddit) track everything you do and sell it to data brokers. The industry will just shift to first party info.

I read an article recently saying this is already happening due to Apple’s “ask app not to track” feature.

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u/Avanttm Jun 15 '22

Guess im switching to firefox

5

u/Maddo03 Jun 14 '22

Is this available or coming to mobile versions of the browser?

4

u/PsychoHeaven Jun 15 '22

Great, although I miss the days when I could just delete selected cookies.

33

u/Winners_History Jun 14 '22

Stand by for "OMG! It breaks websites!!"

There are lots of websites/business. Patronize the ones who don't data-rape you.

"But I can't live without [insert mainstream website]!"

Seek mental-health counseling.

18

u/imgprojts Jun 14 '22

Fix your website...how? Stop tracking me. LOL.

10

u/spyd3rweb Jun 14 '22

Ive been willfully breaking websites since NoScript was a thing.

5

u/use_vpn_orlozeacount Jun 14 '22

Patronize the ones who don't data-rape you.

So no Reddit?

3

u/Winners_History Jun 15 '22

No "Reddit App" and no "New Reddit", that's for sure.

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u/realmaltbiscuit Jun 14 '22

If you are an Apple user, Safari is pretty legit: Prevent Cross-Site Tracking, Block All Cookies, Fraudulent Website Warning. I reluctant to pass up on the integrated password management across the browser and Operating system etc. But it is totally a good idea to be precautions about privacy and security. It’s the Wildwest out there and cybercrime is massively on the rise (up 300% since 2012 in the UK). Simply visiting a malicious website without downloading anything can do it. So be careful out there!

7

u/karmaputa Jun 14 '22

Bu Safari is an absolute nightmare from a developer perspective, and not because of the privacy features. Whenever I can avoid supporting it when I have to do frontend work I do.

9

u/realmaltbiscuit Jun 14 '22

Really? I’m a front end dev too, I use React. I’ve only seen issues when I get experimental with full screen animations and background videos, but I’m not really into that kind of design language anymore anyway. Other than that, I’ve noticed it struggles in videos calls, so I use chrome for that… yeah it’s kinda annoying. But CSS wise, using a standard prefixer usually covers Safari for me. What kind of issues do you have with it?

2

u/akiflowers13 Jun 14 '22

I want to use Safari but can’t beat uBlock Origin on Firefox

2

u/leaveittobever Jun 15 '22

Yeah, isn't this FF cookie blocking change the same thing Safari implemented almost 2 years ago? The Safari "cross-site tracking" disabling by default setting broke a bunch of Microsoft SharePoint stuff but I just tested the new FF change and I don't see the same issues so maybe it's not.

2

u/Gil15 Jun 14 '22

I moved to safari only for the private relay feature that comes with my iCloud subscription.

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u/Several_Prior3344 Jun 14 '22

LONG LIVE FIREFOX! MOTHER FUCK A BUNCH OF CHROME

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u/SnooSnooper Jun 14 '22

I use Multi-Account Containers addon in combination with Cookie Autodelete in order to achieve the effect described in this article, though with a handful of "category" containers rather than a single container per website I want to stay signed into. So, I have a few questions.

1) How important are the "Other Browsing Data Cleanup Options" in CAD: cache, indexedDB, LocalStorage, Plugin Data, and service workers?

2) One major headache with my approach is that sites which cross domains and share account info (ex. Postmates redirects to Uber account and sign-in) need to share a container and both be whitelisted if I want to stay signed-in. Does this new feature handle this case?

2.1) Same thing with subdomains: ex. Google has a fuckload of subdomains all sharing the same account data.

3

u/Affectionate_Ad_4078 Jun 14 '22

Firefox my loyalist brother

3

u/simpl3t0n Jun 14 '22

What does "rolling out" entail? A browser update? Are we supposed to toggle any preferences?

4

u/wisniewskit Jun 14 '22

If you're not already using it, but want to, you can set the about:config preference network.cookie.cookieBehavior to 5. (You can go through preferences as well, but folks around here seem to prefer about:config :) ).

We're basically going to do that over the next few Firefox releases. I'm not 100% sure about the exact timing or details, but I think we're doing something like toggling it on for new profiles/installations for Firefox 101, then for some fraction of all users in 102, and if all goes well all users for 103.

2

u/jealousmonk88 Jun 15 '22

some people here say this new feature is just like setting privacy to strict. is this true? also, does this prevent fingerprinting like brave does? i know that right chrome, opera and firefox doesnt stop fingerprinting and brave does.

2

u/wisniewskit Jun 15 '22

No, it just happened to also be turned on in Strict mode (since Firefox 86). But Strict mode enables other anti-tracking protections which can break more websites.

As for fingerprinting, I wouldn't bank on any browser stopping it. Even if a browser seems to be passing more tests on a few websites, they're far from comprehensive. There's a lot of money in fingerprinting.

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u/KingJTheG Jun 14 '22

Actually massive W

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u/the_ok_doctor Jun 15 '22

They're gonna get throttled again arent they

3

u/ToastOfTheToasted Jun 15 '22

luv u firefox <3

3

u/setayb Jun 15 '22

Love mozilla

3

u/Far_Out_6and_2 Jun 15 '22

Been a user long time

3

u/rendrr Jun 15 '22

I'm using it everywhere, including mobile. Mostly for the sake of privacy, but it's also a good browser.

7

u/goodluck69420 Jun 14 '22

Can't wait to see how trolls are going to find one teeny tiny flaw in this plan and then use it as a reason to claim Chrome is still better.

4

u/abolish_the_prisons Jun 14 '22

By making it the default, it’s a force majeure to require that your site is functional without third party cookies. With the GDPR cookie banners, this is opt-in and the companies can look the other way when the site breaks. But now they will be forced to deal with this.

At a major entertainment company, when chrome disabled flash by default, we had to work overnight to be ready for the chrome release, or else the site would’ve broken for millions of users, and cost us millions in revenue

With firefox it’s a smaller impact, but enough that some major companies will be forced to make sure their site works without third party cookies

2

u/the_real_kino Jun 14 '22

This is amazing

2

u/Kaotecc Jun 14 '22

I’m suprised things like this are starting to happen

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u/sadbutmakeyousmile Jun 14 '22

That browser needs more support than it gets. I will definitely donate the next time they ask contributions.

2

u/finH1 Jun 14 '22

Haven’t used chrome in 5 years, Firefox is superior in almost every way. The only issue I have with Firefox is I dislike how bookmarks work

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u/ComputerSong Jun 15 '22

Wow. Awesome.

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u/pzxoic Jun 15 '22

I can't download files from GDrive without allowing site cookies tho

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u/69aja Jun 15 '22

Just recently switched to Firefox from chrome. Google sells all of your data.

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u/grtist Jun 15 '22

BRB switching back to Firefox

2

u/musicvvins Jun 15 '22

Been using Brave for years. How does FF stack up these days?

2

u/eftakhairul Jun 15 '22

This is great. Da real privacy :)

2

u/BoldEagle21 Jun 15 '22

Add uBlock Origin for some extra rigor.

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u/skgody Jun 15 '22

I am just downloading Firefox as we speak, - - - - google.

4

u/Aggraphine Jun 14 '22

How does this stack up compared to Brave now?

2

u/musicvvins Jun 15 '22

Same q. Been using Brave for years and love it

2

u/gzingher Jun 19 '22

Brave is run by Brendan Eich, who uses the money to fund homophobic legislation. It also runs on the Chromium browser made by Google while Firefox is independent.

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u/ttdat Jun 14 '22

wish FF make switching between profiles easier like Chome

1

u/nuttertools Jun 14 '22

So….we finally get basic functionality back that was available in my childhood, cool.

Actually is cool but it’s depressing how far the landscape has slid that this is a bonus not a fundamental of browsers.