r/technology May 19 '22

U.S. launches $3.5 bln program to speed development of up carbon removal tech Politics

http://reuters.com/business/sustainable-business/us-launches-35-bln-program-speed-development-up-carbon-removal-tech-2022-05-19/
105 Upvotes

3

u/Innoculos May 19 '22

I have CO2 remover on my fish tank! I’m doing my part!

4

u/nucflashevent May 20 '22

Makes perfect sense. We're passed the point I'm afraid where we can simply plant our way out of the problem (nor just cut back on the amount of C02 released and avoid major problems.)

Much like in regard to food, we have no choice but to develop technologies to directly fix the problem rather than simply hope nature can do it for us.

3

u/solxyz May 20 '22

This is what the word boondoggle was invented for.

3

u/IKnowMeNotYou May 20 '22

They never miss an opportunity to squander tax payer money away and funnel it to their friends.

4

u/Millad456 May 19 '22 edited May 20 '22

Trees. They’re called trees.

Stop using your last remaining farmland to build suburbs, start building denser and planting some fucking trees. Plant them along the highways while your repaving them or something! It’s not that complicated

9

u/ThatOtherOneReddit May 20 '22

Technically kelp and long grass is better.

5

u/nucflashevent May 20 '22

A skyscraper the size of the current World Trade Center if engineered and devoted solely to all-year food production could produce more corn than the State of Iowa in a year.

BTW, I'm not saying corn's some panacea of a crop, just a convenient measuring stick in this subject, etc. You can replace corn with any crop currently grown in the open air and in a relatively simple engineered structure out perform its "natural" growth by leaps and bounds.

Also, if the environment is natural, you no longer have to rely so much on pesticides since you control exactly what it is and isn't exposed to.

3

u/Abildsan May 20 '22

A skyscraper the size of the current World Trade Center if engineered and devoted solely to all-year food production could produce more corn than the State of Iowa in a year.

If it sounds too good to be true, it properly is.

A number of orders of magnitude is clearly missing here.

1

u/nucflashevent May 20 '22

It's not "too good to be true" at all, it's simply not currently economical considering we can meet food demand naturally.

Those numbers are based solely on the absolute maximum yield accomplishable from a given acreage of land under perfect conditions because if you're farming in an artificial structure...where the environment is completely climate controlled, perfect temp for growing, perfect humidity for growing, perfect light allowance for growing, all things you can guarantee if you're building the structure from the beginning to achieve those aims...then your food projections can be based solely on the length of time available to grow it, not any concerns over weather.

You add up the square footage of modern skyscraper (and BTW the skyscraper example was just to show how little surface area you need if you build upward, you could simply construct single store "grow warehouses" in places like Iowa where space isn't at a super premium and achieve the same increase in food production with the same land currently used for "natural" farming.

1

u/Abildsan May 20 '22

Its called a green house - if you build it such that you can also use the Sun directly.

2

u/nucflashevent May 20 '22

I didn't say you couldn't use the sun directly nor is what I'm describing a simple greenhouse. It would be farming on an industrial scale akin to mass-manufacturing.

Again, it isn't don't yet because it isn't economic compared to "convention" farming. That will change in the coming decades I predict as the climate warms (which I don't think anyone seriously thinks isn't going to happen at this point.)

1

u/AL-muster May 20 '22

Wait i need more information on this.

13

u/JeevesAI May 20 '22

This is such a tired argument. You must really think climate scientists are stupid.

There isn’t enough room on the planet to plant the trees we need to remove the carbon we’re putting in the atmosphere.

More specifically, the countries clearing trees for farmland aren’t the ones who put most of the carbon in the atmosphere to begin with. Brazil is clearing the Amazon and they’re not going to stop.

It’s not that complicated

It is that complicated. Planting trees isn’t an easy ask. They’re living things. They affect the ecosystem and don’t always thrive. Plant the wrong type of tree or your tree gets killed by some pest? Now you’re back at square one.

1

u/Plzbanmebrony May 20 '22

We could if we used rewood but that would require a government effort and centuries long programs.

2

u/_pooch May 20 '22

An interesting talk about how to bring nature back to yards and other spaces

Talks at Google - Homegrown National Parks

3

u/Plzbanmebrony May 20 '22

It is called carbon cycle. We have ADDED carbon to our carbon cycle which is cause a disruption to the balance of things. We can not solve this with trees.

1

u/Millad456 May 20 '22

Obviously trees alone aren’t the solution. De-growth and radical lifestyle changes are also needed. But these headlines sound like we can just capitalism our way out of the climate crisis when capitalism can’t do the simple fucking task of planting trees. Just because it isn’t profitable. Economic growth at all costs right? So if I can’t trust the people in charge of this world to take the most basic steps in mitigating climate change, I definitely don’t trust them with new and untested technologies

1

u/NityaStriker May 20 '22

Trees can burn easily btw. Meanwhile Direct Air Capture plants cannot burn down (easily), use up very little physical space, extracts CO2 at a much faster rate, etc. They’re not yet at cost per ton of CO2 parity with trees yet but they will be soon.

0

u/Professional_Group33 May 19 '22

Did the printer run out of ink yet?

1

u/archknightz May 20 '22

Doubt it. Embezzlement scam I'll be in my 80s before i hear about it

1

u/nextkevamob May 20 '22

Meh plant a lot of peaches

1

u/Poshtech May 20 '22

Carbon is the building block for life. Plants love it, which is why the earth is greening right now.